Daylight Savings Time

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Daylight Savings Time

Priscila Chavez, Reporter

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      Daylight savings, the days where we change our clocks by an hour in order to preserve sunlight longer. Although most cellphones change the time for you, sometimes clocks on automobiles don’t, which, can make someone have a mini heart attack when you think you’re late for either work or class. Daylight savings may seem like a blessing but can also be a curse, because even though we end up getting one hour more of sleep when it’s time to change the clock back, we end up losing one hour of sleep. Which can make everyone around you feel slugious-like.

     “I love when we get one hour more of sleeping in, but hate when we lose an hour. I do like the fact that during the summer it could be 8 PM and still be sunny but whereas during the winter time by 4 PM it’s already dark outside,” said Erika Rodriguez (‘19).

     Daylight savings might not mean anything to you, whether you just think about it getting dark real quick during the winter and still bright out during the summertime, but it actually has some history and meaning behind it. DST started way back during in 1916 by George Vernon Hudson, where he pitched in the idea of it over 21 years ago in 1895. His proposal was finally used on April 30, 1916, when The German Empire, Austria- Hungary organized it nationwide. Then various other countries hopped onto the idea of it since the energy crisis of the 1970s. Where countries around the world came to a conflict of substantial petroleum shortages. Now, in the modern day world, not all area apply this method of conserving time. For example, Africa and Asia don’t participate in the time zone. As for Illinois, Daylight Savings Time for 2019 will begin at 2:00 AM on Sunday, March 10 and will end at 2:00 AM Sunday, November 3.

     “Sometimes I don’t see the whole purpose of Daylight savings because it’s not that much of a difference but it is what it is,” said Itzel Munoz (‘19).

    It is said to have been proven from sleep experts that it can take up to a week for our bodies to adjust to the changes and has been recommended to go to bed and wake up 10-15 minutes earlier to help slowly adjust to the new shifts and to help maintain a consistent schedule, according to Cleveland Clinic, Tina Walters.

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